Increased city tariffs across the board are straining residents’ budgets to the limit
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Increased city tariffs across the board are straining residents’ budgets to the limit

As of July 1, higher tariffs apply to all municipal entities.

Explaining this, Nyaniso Jeku, on behalf of the city, says that these are: “A statutory property tax, levied based on the value of the property. Water and electricity are charged on a sliding scale; this means the more you use, the more you pay.”

Read more: Emmarentia residents unite to tackle ongoing water crisis

Julia Fish of JoburgCAN, an Outa initiative, says: “Residents are feeling the pressure all the way. High interest rates, double taxation and tariff costs above inflation are simply an unaffordable avalanche heading towards households. There is no relief. If you try to make changes to save money, such as reducing your consumption, you will be charged a fixed fee for prepayment or based on the value of the property rather than your consumption for sanitation. The city is turning a deaf ear to the pleas sent during the IDP process, and people either stop paying, illegally connect or go without essentials like food to cover their bills; no one has an extra 12.7% to give away.”

Speaking about City Power’s price increases for prepaid electricity customers, as explained on page 3, Ward 117 Councillor Tim Truluck said: “Be prepared for a double whammy when you buy your first electricity voucher each month as the R230 surcharge is deducted from the 12.7% annual increase.” He says: “City Power is technically bankrupt – it has debts of around R20bn and is losing around R500m to R1bn a month.

But it is one of those ‘too big to fail’ entities and the City has earmarked R9.4bn from its 2024/25 budget to cover losses. They desperately need the money.”

Georgina Guedes, a local resident, says: “It’s always a bit of a kick in the teeth mid-year when tariffs increase. I understand the economic situation and the challenges at Eskom, but 12.7% for electricity really hurts when it’s well above any inflation-related increase a person could receive, not to mention the overall cost of living. The increase for rubbish and water is a bit easier to swallow, but it’s still not great in light of the service cuts we had last year. We had to pay for rubbish collection during months when there was almost no rubbish collection. I hope these bodies use their higher tariffs to improve service delivery in the coming year.”

Read also: Emmarentia residents take to the streets demanding water supplies

New water tariffs.
New water tariffs.

Electricity

Julia Fish from JoburgCAN.
Julia Fish from JoburgCAN.

Water

  • 5 KL water Free Free
  • 10 KL water 97.32 104.81
  • 20 KL water 402.27 433.24

Prepaid water charges are slightly lower than metered water charges, and sanitation costs for poor customers are fully covered by the city.

Refuse

Decline charges.
Decline charges.

Real estate rates

The first R300 000 of the value of all residential properties is excluded from the assessment. If a property owner owns more than one residential property, only one property will be given the R300 000 threshold. The remaining properties will only benefit from the R15 000 exclusion.

Real estate discounts.
Real estate discounts.

Residential
2023/24******** 2024/25************ Increase
0.008791 *********0.009125 ************3.8%

Business and trade
2023/24******** 2024/25************ Increase
0.021978*********0.022813****************3.8%

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